WHAT WE DID: 2/28

  • SEVENTH GRADE ENGLISH
    • Students turned in their HRL
    • ERWC MODULE III: Students drafted the memo re: limiting parent access on campus
  • ENGLISH 8 & HONORS ENGLISH 8
    • Students turned in their HRL
    • ERWC MODULE III: Students drafted the memo re: social robots on campus

CELEBRATING BLACK HISTORY MONTH WITH NOTABLE AFRICAN AMERICANS

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Madam C.J. Walker was born Sarah Breedlove on December 23, 1867, near Delta, Louisiana. After suffering from a scalp ailment that resulted in her own hair loss, she invented a line of African-American hair care products in 1905. She promoted her products by traveling around the country giving lecture-demonstrations and eventually established Madame C.J. Walker Laboratories to manufacture cosmetics and train sales beauticians. Her savvy business acumen led her to be one of the first American women to become a self-made millionaire. She was also known for her philanthropic endeavors including donating the largest amount of money by an African-American toward the construction of an Indianapolis YMCA in 1913.

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WHAT WE DID: 2/27

CELEBRATING BLACK HISTORY MONTH WITH NOTABLE AFRICAN AMERICANS

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Jacqueline Woodson’s awards include 3 Newbery Honors, a Coretta Scott King Award and 3 Coretta Scott King Honors, 2 National Book Awards, a Margaret A. Edwards Award and an ALAN Award — both for Lifetime Achievement in YA Literature. She is the author of more than 2 dozen books for children and young adults and lives with her family in Brooklyn, New York.

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If you would like to learn more about Jacqueline Woodson, go to her website: http://www.jacquelinewoodson.com/all-about-me/my-biography/

WHAT WE DID: 2/24

  • SEVENTH GRADE ENGLISH
    • ERWC MODULE III – Helicopter Parents: Help or Hinderance?
      • Article
      • Survey
      • Quick write
    • HOMEWORK
      • HRL due Tuesday, 2/8
  • ENGLISH 8 & HONORS ENGLISH 8
    • ERWC MODULE III – ROBOTS IN THE CLASSROOM
      • TWILIGHT ZONE EPISODE: “I SING THE BODY ELECTRIC”
    • HOMEWORK
      • HRL due Tuesday, 2/8

CELEBRATING BLACK HISTORY MONTH WITH NOTABLE AFRICAN-AMERICANS

Simone Biles is the most decorated American gymnast, winning 19 Olympic and World Championship medals.

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Born in Ohio in 1997, Simone Biles has become one of America’s top gymnasts. After dominating at the junior elite level, she won her first U.S. and world all-around titles in 2013. In 2015, she claimed a record third straight world all-around title. She went on to lead the U.S. Olympic women’s gymnastics team, nicknamed “The Final Five,” to win gold at the 2016 Summer Games, and dominated the competition, winning gold in the women’s individual all-around, vault and floor exercise and bronze in the balance beam. With 19 Olympic and World Championship medals, she is the most decorated American gymnast.

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WHAT WE DID: 2/23

  • SEVENTH GRADE ENGLISH
    • Students began ERWC Module III: Helicopter Parents
    • Homework:
      • HRL due Tuesday, 2/28
  • ENGLISH 8 & HONORS ENGLISH 8
    • Students began ERWC Module III: Robots in the Classroom?
    • Homework:
      • HRL due Tuesday, 2/28

CELEBRATING BLACK HISTORY MONTH WITH NOTABLE ANGELENOS

Acclaimed ballerina Misty Copeland is the first African-American performer to be appointed as a principal dancer for American Ballet Theatre.

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Born on September 10, 1982 in Kansas City, Missouri, and raised in San Pedro, California, Misty Copeland endured a tumultuous home life to find her way to dance, eventually studying under California ballet instructor Cindy Bradley. Copeland joined the studio company of American Ballet Theatre in 2000, becoming a soloist several years later and starring in an array of productions such as The Nutcrackerand Firebird. An icon whose star shines beyond the world of classical dance, in late June 2015 Copeland became the first African-American performer to be appointed as an ABT principal dancer in the company’s decades long history.

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WHAT WE DID: 2/22

  • SEVENTH GRADE ENGLISH
    • Students turned in their odes and Open House invitations
    • Small group to answer AoW questions
      • Provide a brief summary of the article.
      • What is the most interesting detail? Explain.
      • How did the “black computers” become famous?
      • What is the author’s purpose? PIE? Explain.
      • What message did YOU take away? Explain.
  • ENGLISH 8 & HONORS ENGLISH 8
    • Small group to answer AoW questions
      • Provide a brief summary of the article.
      • What is the most interesting detail? Explain.
      • How did the “black computers” become famous?
      • What is the author’s purpose? PIE? Explain.
      • What message did YOU take away? Explain.

CELEBRATING BLACK HISTORY MONTH WITH NOTABLE AFRICAN-AMERICANS

Percy L. Julian (1899 – 1975) is known as the “soybean chemist,” for his extraordinary success in developing innovative drugs and industrial chemicals from natural soya products. The firefighting solution he devised, known as “bean soup,” helped save the lives of thousands of sailors and naval airmen during World War II. His discoveries earned him more than 130 chemical patents and many professional awards.

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His spirit lives on in dozens of lifesaving discoveries, as well as in the halls of Percy L. Julian Junior High School in Oak Park, Illinois. Julian was quoted as saying, “I have had one goal in my life, that of playing some role in making life a little easier for the persons who come after me.”

WHAT WE DID: 2/21

  • SEVENTH GRADE ENGLISH
    • New HRL: due Tuesday, 2/28
    • New AoW: annotations with text tags and commentary due 2/22
    • Invitation to Open House
  • HONORS ENGLISH 8
    • New HRL
    • New AoW: annotations with text tags and commentary due 2/22
    • Short expository essay on “Intersectionality”
  • ENGLISH 8
    • New HRL
    • New AoW: annotations with text tags and commentary due 2/22
    • Short expository essay on “Intersectionality”

CELEBRATING BLACK HISTORY MONTH

On September 13, 1953, the New York Times featured the wedding of John F. Kennedy and Jacqueline Bouvier on the front page. The article contained a photograph of the bride’s intricate gown and a detailed description of its “ivory silk taffeta, embellished with interwoven bands of tucking, finished with a portrait neckline and a bouffant skirt.” The only thing missing from the coverage was the name of Ann Lowe, the dress designer.

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Ann Lowe’s story is remarkable. She was born in 1898, in Clayton, Alabama, the great granddaughter of a slave woman and plantation owner. With little more than a few years of education in the segregated schools of turn-of-the-century Alabama, sewing lessons from her mother and grandmother, and encouragement from her early clients, Lowe became a designing powerhouse. She learned her craft in her family’s custom dress shop in Alabama. Her mother died when she was just 16. At the age of 18, she moved to Florida in 1916, where she quickly became a premier custom dressmaker.

Her success in outfitting the debutantes of Tampa for their weddings and fancy dress balls allowed Lowe to move to Manhattan in the fall of 1927. “I just knew that if I could come to New York and make dresses for society people,” she said in an 1966 Oakland Tribune interview, “my dreams would be fulfilled.”

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Lowe designed dresses for other fashion houses at first, throughout the Great Depression and World War II, but by 1950, she was working steadily at her own Madison Avenue dress salon. Her elegant work was embraced by members of the Social Register, and in 1957, the New York Times celebrated Lowe as an expert in the field “who has been turning out impeccably dressed debutantes for twenty years, and charges up to $500 for her custom-made evening stunners.” Lowe’s gowns appeared with proper credit in VogueVanity Fair.and Town and Country magazines throughout the 1950s and 1960s. After closing her shop for financial reasons in 1960, she became a featured designer at the prestigious Adam Room at Saks Fifth Avenue. Lowe reopened her salon in 1964.

During a 1965 appearance on the Mike Douglas Show, Lowe explained that the driving force behind her work was not a quest for fame or fortune but a desire “to prove that a Negro can become a major dress designer.”

Lowe was also inspired by a true love for couture design and her lifelong exposure to custom dressmaking. “I feel so happy when I am making clothes,” she explained in the Oakland Tribune interview, “that I could just jump up and down with joy.”

Lowe’s dresses were important to her. “I like for my dresses to be admired,” she told the Saturday Evening Post in 1964. “I like to hear about it—the oohs and ahs as they come into the ballroom. Like when someone tells me, ‘the Ann Lowe dresses were doing all of the dancing at the cotillion last night.’ That’s what I like to hear.”

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Through the highs and lows of her groundbreaking career, Lowe continued to live simply, wearing her own designs and focusing on her work in her modest Harlem apartment until her retirement in 1972. Miss Lowe died in 1981.

 

DON’T FORGET!!!

SEVENTH GRADE ENGLISH: YOUR ODE IN FINAL DRAFT FORM IS DUE ON TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21ST. IT MUST BE COLORED, DECORATED, AND DONE ACCORDING TO THE DIRECTIONS.

ENGLISH 8 & HONORS ENGLISH 8: YOUR “SEEN/UNSEEN” INTERSECTIONALITY COLLAGE IS DUE ON TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21ST. IT MUST BE COLORED, DECORATED, AND DONE ACCORDING TO THE DIRECTIONS.

CELEBRATING BLACK HISTORY WITH NOTABLE ANGELENOS

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Hattie McDaniel (June 10, 1895 – October 26, 1952) was an African American actress, singer-songwriter, and comedian. She is best known for her role as Mammy in Gone with the Wind (1939), for which she won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress, the first Academy Award won by an African American.

In addition to acting in many films, Miss McDaniel was a professional singer-songwriter, comedian, stage actress, radio performer, and television star; she was the first black woman to sing on the radio in the U.S. She appeared in over 300 films, although she received screen credits for only 80 or so.

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Miss McDaniel has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in Hollywood: one at 6933 Hollywood Boulevard for her contributions to radio and one at 1719 Vine Street for acting in motion pictures. In 1975, she was inducted into the Black Filmmakers Hall of Fame, and in 2006, she became the first black Oscar winner honored with a US postage stamp.

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